“People-food” for your dog

“People-food” can be very healthy for your pup as a treat, often more so than processed treats.  Do your homework & check with your vet to make sure you’re safe & healthy when supplementing your dog’s daily diet with fresh food.  And follow these guidelines:

  • Limit supplements to 10% of your dog’s daily calories.
  • Keep track of Pup’s weight by look & feel. From above, you should be able to see an indent @ your dog’s waist.  With Pup standing, feel his ribs.  You should be able to feel his ribs, without having to push thru layers of fat.  But his ribs shouldn’t feel too pronounced, and you shouldn’t be able to see the outline of his ribs.  Of course, your vet is a great judge of Pup’s healthiest weight.
  • Bad people-food:  Cookies, cake, white bread or anything made with white flour & sugar.  Yeast dough.  Baking soda & baking powder.  Candy, especially chocolate or sugar-free types (xylitol).  Hot dogs, lunch meats or any processed meats.  High-fat dairy products, ice cream or cheese.  (Some dogs are lactose intolerant, and shouldn’t have any dairy products.) Onions, onion powder, grapes, raisins, garlic, avocados, and macadamia nuts.  Salty, fatty foods.  Coffee & alcohol.
  • Good people-food:  Fresh veggies (broccoli florets & baby carrots – blanched or ground up; celery; cooked zucchini, squash, or potatoes – cut into bite-sized pieces).  Fresh fruit (apple slices, blueberries, pieces of melon or banana).  Cooked fish, chicken or lean beef (no bones!).  Unsalted cashews (only a few; they’re caloric).  Unsalted rice cakes.  A spoonful of nonfat, plain yogurt; nonfat cottage cheese; or a splash of nonfat milk.

Information provided on this site is not a substitute for veterinary care.   See your vet before you begin a complementary natural health care or exercise plan.  The statements on this Web site have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration/Center for Veterinary Medicine, and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

© 2011 Critter Consulting

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